20 Things to Loot From the Body

Adventurers are always looting the bodies of their fallen enemies. But often the NPC seems to have nothing but weapons, armour, (hopefully) a couple of magic items and a smattering of coinage.

By William McAusland (Outland Arts)

By William McAusland (Outland Arts)

 

That’s great for PCs hunting for loot, but it sadly fails to provide any depth or verisimilitude to the experience; after all, everyone’s got bits and bobs in their pockets! Use the table below, to generate the details of minor items the fallen foes have about their person.

  1. A partially carved piece of wood that might represent a small dog…or it might not; the carving is so bad, it’s hard to tell.
  2. Three worn and bent silver coins of obviously ancient origin. The details on the coins’ faces cannot be made out, but one has a small chip missing.
  3. Two keys tied together with a short length of fraying twine.
  4. A bloodstained cloth along with a tightly wound bandage and a half-empty flask of oil.
  5. A small wooden box containing a fine white powder—snuff—that smells strongly of cinnamon.
  6. A list of names on a scrap of parchment. Only the last two have not had a line drawn through them.
  7. A much used and well-worn flint and steel along with some scraps of dried and frayed cloth all bundled together in a small, waterproof pouch.
  8. A handful of dried meat and an all but empty tiny jar of honey.
  9. An empty bone scroll tube missing both its stoppers. The bone is yellowed and obviously old.
  10. A tarnished and broken golden chain missing several links. Several of the links are very worn and the whole thing is worth no more than 10 gp—as scrap metal.
  11. A small, mud-stained book. The pages within are in better condition, although not particularly well written or illustrated. The work is an overview of a nearby kingdom and details major settlements and geographical features.
  12. Several long pieces of string all hopelessly tangled together.
  13. A dozen gold coins (seemingly). In reality, these heavy coins are of lead and have been covered with a golden wash. The job is good enough to stand a cursory glance.
  14. A whetstone, an oily rag and a small flask of oil all contained within a stained, slightly smelly belt pouch.
  15. A scrap of parchment with the message, “Midnight on the Street of Smoke.”
  16. A scrap of parchment depicting a very crude treasure map. Named features include, “Big Tree”, “Pond”, and “Bone Pile”. However, there are no other features to enable anyone to actually follow the map (or what the treasure might be).
  17. Several sheaves of parchment depicting scantily clad elven men in rather odd poses—the illustrations are surprisingly well detailed.
  18. A simple golden band—perhaps a wedding band. The engraving inside spells out “Beloved” in Dwarves runes. The ring is worth 50 gp.
  19. A pouch containing several bunches of dried herbs. Each bunch is tied with a different colour twine.
  20. Several small chunks of rock of a type found in the locality. Each of the chunks has fleck of gold embedded within that glimmers in the light—a tantalising clue (perhaps) to a nearby as yet undiscovered deposit of gold.

Related Articles

I Loot the Body

Are your PCs always looting the bodies of the fallen? Want more of these cool little details? Fear not—Raging Swan Press has got you covered! I Loot the Body, by Josh Vogt, available in both Pathfinder Roleplaying Game compatible and System Neutral Editions, is designed to provide hundreds of small knickknacks to “populate” your NPC’s pouches and pockets.

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16 thoughts on “20 Things to Loot From the Body

  1. Won’t the players immedietly latch on to these random items as an obvious quest item or other key artifact or plot advancing device?

    • Ross — for me that’s a good thing! I almost only ever improvise the plot, so any random input like this into the game fiction helps me.

    • You are quite possibly right, Ross! They could be minor points of interest, red herrings or just window dressing. It’s whatever you as the GM decide!

  2. I LOVE these things! It can make a seemingly ordinary adventure or game into something MUCH more. Intrigue, mystery, crime, or any other possible direction. Such lists are truly great tools for DMs young and old!

  3. One of my proudest moments of AD&D looting is when we were fighting orks and the chief downed a potion and the next thing was I got a crit and killed him. My character gutted the chief and tied the ends of his stomach. We detected magic and found that the potion had not taken effect and was still magic. Rigged the stomach up like a wine skin and I could use it to drink the unknown potion but the bad news was that the ork had eaten recently and to have the potion take effect EVERYTHING in the stomach had to be drank.

    my gore covered character (he had been elbow deep inside the ork) asked if anybody else wanted the potion and for some odd reason the rest of the party said I could have it and not even count toward my share.

    that took looting a body to a whole new level.